Use this place as a jumpboard to the previous Doors of Perception conferences archive (within their original interface)
Doors 1 (1993) The first Doors 2 (1994) Home

Doors 3 (1995) Info-eco Doors 4 (1996) Speed

Doors 5 (1998) Play Doors 6 (2000) Lightness
Doors East 1 (2000) Doors 7 (2002) Flow
Doors East 2 (2003) Tomorrow's Services Doors 8 (2005) Infra

Doors 1 (1993) The first

We did the first conference in 1993 to find out what the Internet meant for design - and vice versa. There was a lot of talk in the US about teleshopping, and video-on-demand. This sounded boring, so we organised Doors to consider more exciting and useful alternatives. The result was more excitement than answers, but at least we added a critical note to the debate about the role of ICTs.

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Doors 2 (1994) Home
DOORS 2 was about connectivity and 'home' - as a place, but also as an idea. Many big companies then (as now) saw home as a place where they could download content, and upload money. The outcome of Doors 2 was a consensus that designers should insist, where possible, on two-way channels of communication - and act as 'editors' of technology where the home is concerned.

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Doors 3 (1995) Info-eco
DOORS 3 was on the theme of 'info-eco' - the interaction of information technology and environmental sustainability. Two huge issues! This was one of the first events to bring 'info' and 'eco' people together. The result was a chaotic but dynamic week: many projects and alliances spawned at that event are still going strong today.

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Doors 4 (1996) Speed
DOORS 4 was all about 'speed'. Ivan Illich argued that designers should be critical of speed as an end in itself. Many of the Doors delegates hated the idea - they wanted more speed, at any cost. This was another reminder that the Doors crowd has several minds of its own! The key outcome of Doors 4 was a feeling that 'fast information, slow matter,' was a feasible design and innovation strategy.

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Doors 5 (1998) Play
DOORS 5 had the theme of 'play'. The event brought the computer games crowd into contact with learning experts. People thought that the computer games they saw were mostly great, and the e-learning products mostly awful. We wanted to know: is there a way to capture the creative power of play for work, and for learning? Doors 5 put the design of learning environments strongly on the agenda.

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Doors 6 (2000) Lightness
DOORS 6 was on 'lightness'. Our speakers touched lightly on everything from cities to software - with a dig at 'software bloat' along the way. As a design strategy, lightness appeals to both designers and entrepreneurs: you can't have too much of it. The outcome of Doors 6 was a commitment among many participants to re-think the design of every product, service, and place in terms of matter and energy performance.

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Doors East 1 (2000)
The purpose of our memorable week in Ahmedabad, India, at the National Institute of Design, was to accelerate the exchange of people, knowledge and experiences among Indian and European designers and internet entrepreneurs. We wanted to know: what can western interaction designers learn from Indian design and internet culture? and, what are the prospects for future joint work between the two communities? The answers were: a lot, and fantastic. We looked at the design of services enabled by the internet in a South Asia context, and discussed the relationships between information technology, development , and environmental sustainability.

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Doors 7 (November 2002)
DOORS 7 in Amsterdam was about the design challenge of pervasive computing. A wide variety of designers, thinkers and entrepreneurs addressed the questions: what are we to make of the trillions of smart tags, sensors, smart materials, connected appliances, wearable computing, and soon implants, that are now being unleashed upon the world? To what question are they an answer? Who is going to look after them, and how? And what social consequences will follow when every object around us becomes smart, and connected?

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Doors East 2 (2003) Tomorrow's Services
Designers, technologists, entrepreneurs, and grassroots innovators, shared their project experiences developing new kinds of services. They presented and discussed projects from India, South Asia, and the North, that deliver new ways to meet needs in daily life in the areas of home, work, learning, mobility, and sociability.

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Doors 8 (2005) Infra
On platforms for social innovation: What infrastructures are needed to enable bottom-up, edge-in social innovation? And how do we design them? Doors of Perception 8 in New Delhi continued our exploration of how to design services, some of them enabled by information technology, that meet basic needs in new ways.

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Doors 9 (2007) Food Systems
Global food systems are becoming unsustainable in terms of environmental impact, health, and social quality. Up to 25 percent of the ecological impact of an 'advanced' city can be attributed to its food systems. But what to do? For Doors of Perception 9, we went back to India in a search for inspiring new models and tools.

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Dott07 (2007) Social Innovation Biennial
Designs of the time (Dott 07) was a year of community design projects in North East England that explored what life in a sustainable region could be like - and how design can help us get there. It was an initiative of the UK Design Council and a regional development agency, One North East.

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City Eco Lab (2008)
City Eco Lab was a two-week festival of projects that took place in November in St Etienne, France. These 50-plus projects involved productive urban gardens; low energy food storage; communal composting solutions; re-discovery of hidden rivers; neighbourhood energy dashboards; de-motorised courier services; and a wide variety of software tools to help people share resources.

 visit the website